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Daniela Morein

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CoderZ by Intelitek Wins Tech & Learning ‘Best of Show’ Award at ISTE 2018

CoderZ is an online platform teaching students fundamental coding and programming skills through fun virtual robotics

Derry, NH (July 2, 2018) – Intelitek today announced that its online coding and robotics program CoderZ, was named as a Best of Show winner by Tech & Learning at the 2018 International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Conference and Expo.

iste18-bos

In its fifth year, Tech & Learning’s ISTE 2018 Best of Show awards highlight outstanding products exhibited at ISTE. Winners are selected by a panel of professional users and editors for having the greatest potential to be game changers in education technology. The judges rated their impressions on a sliding scale, evaluating areas such as quality and effectiveness, ease of use and creative use of technology. They then met in person to decide which technologies will have the most impact in the classroom and deserved to be named Best of Show.

“Once again, the ISTE show floor was inundated with edtech—from the latest in coding, robotics and makerspace gear to sophisticated upgrades in district-wide enterprise assessment software,” said Tech & Learning’s Managing Director of Content, Kevin Hogan. “And once again, our expert panel of judges kicked the tires. It’s a yeoman’s task and we take it seriously in selecting these companies and their products.”

CoderZ is a powerful, easy to use online platform that teaches students in grades 6-12 valuable STEM skills that prepare them for college and careers such as coding, robotics and physical computing. Through a fun interface with virtual robots controlled by the user, students learn a simple, Scratch-like language called Blockly for new coders or start working directly with Java code if they already have coding experience.

Accessible online from the classroom or at home, CoderZ puts the world of coding and robotics in the hands of every student anywhere they have an Internet connection. Students receive immediate feedback for their work with the integrated online simulator, which allows students to test code and experiment with virtual robots.

For educators, CoderZ integrates an engaging curriculum and learning management including project submission and grading, class and student statistics, video tutorials, and more.

“For more than 35 years, Intelitek has been transforming education and bringing STEM programs into classrooms across the globe through comprehensive technology learning solutions,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek. “We’re pleased to have been recognized for this award and selected as one of the top products at ISTE this year.”

ISTE 2018 Best of Show winners will be highlighted in the August 2018 issue of Tech & Learning. A full list of winners recognized at ISTE can be found at https://www.techlearning.com/ed-tech-ticker/t-l-announces-iste-best-of-show-winners.

For more information about Intelitek and its product offerings, please visit www.intelitek.com and www.gocoderz.com.

About Intelitek

Intelitek’s innovative tools and technologies empower instructors and inspire students to improve the world around them. The Company’s sustainable support and professional development ensure the continued success of educational programs. By helping deliver the competencies needed for in-demand careers, Intelitek is producing results for students, teachers, nations, and economies.

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Education

Existing Paradigms in Education

The world is constantly shifting and changing, introducing new generations of people who grow up, leave school and enter the workforce. And yet education has largely remained the same for more than 100 years.

At Intelitek, we turn many of the existing beliefs about education on their head, revitalizing the educational system for the students of today. We encourage schools and educational institutions to revisit many of the incorrect paradigms which are standing in the way of building a strong workforce for tomorrow.

Education Paradigms

Existing Paradigm #1: Students are a Blank Slate

Historically, a student’s brain was considered a blank slate, similar to a car chassis at the beginning of a production cycle. Educators used to refer to each new student as an empty container, ready to receive an outpouring of knowledge from the teacher. We now know that this is not the case.

All students do not start out the same, and none of them are blank slates. All students have prior knowledge, and this varies from person to person. Educators need to be able to teach each student as an individual, becoming mentors, and enabling students to reconcile what they are learning with their own existing understanding of the world. In the right environment, students will learn “how to learn” and be transformed from being a passive recipient of knowledge, to being active in their own learning.

Shift in Paradigm: Knowledge is a Personal Activity

How to Achieve This:

  • Tailor-made learning paths – no two students are forced to learn the same thing
  • Students should be encouraged to find their unique area of success and aptitude with the help of formative assessments.
  • Focus on real-world problem-solving skills with reflection on student’s studies and activities
  • Encourage students to hypothesize and experiment

Existing Paradigm #2: Computers Interfere with Thinking

You only have to look at the attitude to calculators to understand the negative view of computers in the education system. Rather than be seen as a tool to master and use to succeed, many believe that technology hinders thinking skills.

The truth is, that students don’t need to learn how to solve the same problems that computers can do, as they will never beat the efficiency and accuracy of machines. Instead, computers can be used to help us sharpen our thinking and create opportunities for active learning.

Shift in Paradigm: Learning to Master Technology Can Open Doors for Tomorrow’s Workforce

How to Achieve This:

  • Create curricula emphasizing STEM subjects for a more technologically able workforce
  • Make technology, coding and robotics accessible for the 99% of students who cannot currently access it
  • Utilize the Connected Computing revolution to allow for distance learning and virtual robotics.

Existing Paradigm #3: Learning Occurs Individually and Teachers should take the Lead

Even today, knowledge is given and received in silos, again mirroring what we saw in the age of production lines. Teachers are just that – supervisors made for giving over knowledge, and do not encourage questions or the adapting of their information. Students are expected to sit quietly and take in information, without interaction with their peers, or collaboration with other students or guests.

Shift in Paradigm: Teachers are Mentors, and no Student is an Island

How to Achieve This:

  • Foster discussion and teamwork amongst students.
  • Create constructive competition to encourage success.
  • Discourage the idea of the teacher as the ‘single source of knowledge’.
  • Train teachers to build new curriculum from scratch, offering students a personal journey.
  • Move away from replacing teachers with computers. Rather, teach instructors to be mentors, giving them a vital place in supporting their student’s education.

 

Existing Paradigm #4: Knowledge is the Goal of Education

Our schools are determining the workforce of tomorrow, and currently many of them revolve around curricula that focus on the transfer of knowledge rather than education. Intelligences vary from student to student, and all will have their roles in society once education is over.

Taking the time to identify which students have which intelligences can be key for success. There are many examples. Some might have Verbal intelligence – suited for presenting ideas and thoughts, or Intrapersonal intelligence for people skills. Visual intelligence is suited to thinking in three dimensions. Becoming familiar with recognizing these skills is essential.

Shift in Paradigm: Knowledge Acquisition does not define Education

How to Achieve This:

  • Recognize that students have multiple intelligences, and work to foster these.
  • Teach lifelong learning skills.
  • Don’t forget soft skills. Confidence, collaboration and creativity are all essential in the workforce.
  • Use technology to give teachers the pedagogic skills to do more than transfer knowledge.

When we treat today’s students with yesterdays educational paradigms, we are doing them a disservice. As educators and institutions, we have a responsibility to constantly revisit and redefine education to make sure we are providing the best standard of learning possible. This includes looking back at the incorrect assumptions we have made in the past, not only about how we teach, but also about how students learn.

Read more about Education 4.0 by downloading this white paper from Intelitek.


Education 4.0

What is Education 4.0?

In the last 250 years, society has experienced four Industrial Revolutions, which have entirely changed the face of industry as we know it. Here at Intelitek, we believe that the changes in industry should and must have a direct impact on the way we build the education system for today’s students. If your goal is to create students who can become valuable members of the workforce and independent problem solvers, educational paradigms need to be rebuilt alongside each new revolution in society.

The Four Industrial Revolutions: An Overview

Industrial Revolution Timeline

In 1780, the invention of the Steam Engine by James Watts changed the workforce forever. Suddenly, manual labor was less in demand, as machines were able to complete jobs faster and more accurately. New jobs working machinery were created, and families moved from the countryside to the city, from agricultural life to a life of industry.

These kinds of jobs were in demand until around 1900, when the production line became popular during the second industrial revolution. Soon, workers all had their own role to play in the production line, with expertise in one small area, instead of end-to-end knowledge about a product. The production line improved efficiency, and allowed for high quality products to be sold cheaply to the masses. Notably, Steel production heralded the creation of Skyscrapers, Railways, Electric motors, and more. Society had changed again.

Just 70 years later, the computer brought a third industrial revolution. The rigid systems of the production line were suddenly made flexible, and computing quickly spread across all industries, from Agriculture, to Banking, Management and Shipping.

In 2000, the ubiquitous nature of the Internet ushered in the fourth industrial revolution, the Connected Computer. Connectivity between systems has made remote working and collaboration a possibility, allowing businesses to become global enterprises, and retail to explode internationally with the help of production, shipping and finance online industries. Society has adapted to be more social, more knowledgeable, and many believe the world is a far smaller place than ever before.

The Effect on Education

If we look back at how education has changed since the first industrial revolution, we might better understand the challenges for students and teachers today.

In 1780, there was little to no expectation that children would have any education whatsoever. People learned a trade, typically with on the job apprentice training. Where it existed, education was a luxury for the rich. Later, when the second revolution occurred, industry needed skilled workers, who needed to be literate in order to be valuable in the workforce. Suddenly, an education was needed. And this education system, founded on the needs of the second industrial revolution is in many ways still in place today.

Based on earlier life learning models, schools taught knowledge. Students came in with no knowledge, the teacher fed them information in specific subjects and at the end, the student was tested to evaluate if they remembered what they were taught. This fostered a rigid framework of study disciplines, education standards and eventually standardized testing. A production line!

The introduction of the computer did not change the underlying ethos behind our education system. Instead, education professionals simply took advantage of the technology and replaced teachers with computers, enabling teaching, learning and assessment to be handled by machine. While long distance learning and a vast amount of information is now accessible thanks to the Internet revolution, the structure of our education system has still been left unchallenged. Learning outcomes are still being tested by the criteria set out in the second industrial revolution. We are still treating educators and students like they are part of a production line.

Education 4.0

In order for this to change, we must revisit the educational paradigms, and focus on the areas that need rethinking. In today’s new world of fast changing technology and information overload, students need to be trained and not taught. Information needs to be made accessible and students need to learn how to find it rather than the teacher offering it to them in a rigid structure.

We now understand that students are not alike, do not have the same starting point, can learn and absorb different areas of focus differently and need to be guided to develop their skills rather than taught a set of predefined data points. Education 4.0 needs to align with Industry 4.0 and prepare students for the next industrial revolution which will happen in their lifetime.

Aligning Education 4.0 with Industry 4.0

It’s time to bring education into the 21st Century. Flexible, tailor-made curricula, taught by teachers who become mentors to their students, and treat them as individuals is the least that today’s schools deserve. Giving the workforce of tomorrow the tools to become active lifelong learners can create a diverse and pluralistic society where every person understands and plays to their strengths, building a fair and self-sustaining model for education rather than knowledge.

aligning industry requirements with education

Read more about Industry 4.0 and Education 4.0 by downloading this white paper from Intelitek.


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