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Nevada Cyber Robotics Coding Competition Marks End of Multi-State Competition Season, Beginning of CS Learning for Many Across the States

DERRY, N.H. – Jan. 28, 2019 – The Nevada Cyber Robotics Coding Competition, scheduled to take place February 1 at the Texas Station Convention Center in Las Vegas, marks the end of the 2018/19 season of the Cyber Robotics Coding Competitions (CRCCs), a series of first-of-its-kind, free-to-participate online coding and robotics tournaments for students in grades five through nine. A total of 581 schools with 37,212 students in 26 states participated in the 2018-19 competitions and Nevada is the 10th face to face finals event. More than a third of the students (38 percent) were from schools without a computer science course, a third of all participating schools were in rural areas and 240 schools were Title I.

Organized by the Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation (ISCEF), the CRCCs engage students in STEM learning by using game-based competitions that are both safe and fun. Two hundred educators who were surveyed unanimously agreed that the competition platform, Intelitek’s award-winning CoderZ Cyber Robotics Learning Environment, which features a graphical simulation of LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robots, engaged their students. For example, Brenda Tharp, the teacher-mentor of the North Hampton School team in New Hampshire, stated, “I can’t say enough about your program. It engages students in STEM and is FUN!!”

The vast majority (98 percent) of surveyed educators also agreed that that the platform’s content is relevant for computer science and STEM learning. “We absolutely loved this program and it gave students an opportunity to explore robotics/programming more!” said Brittany Sosa, a teacher at Canyon Middle School in New Braufels, Texas.

No prior experience on the part of students or teachers was required for schools to participate in the competition. In fact, the majority (66 percent) of the teachers mentoring the student teams had no experience with teaching coding. ISCEF prepared participating teachers by providing orientation and training and allowing them to practice on CoderZ before the competitions began.

The top three states in terms of student participation were the following:

–  Texas where 52 schools signed up 4,293 students for the competition;

–  New Jersey where 83 schools had 6,427 students take part; and

– Pennsylvania where 6,444 students from a whopping 104 schools participated.

Nevada also has had a good showing, with 3,222 students from 18 schools competing throughout the state. For the state finals, two student representatives from each school will be challenged to complete advanced missions (coding tasks) under a time constraint. Judges will evaluate the teams’ total score as well as other variables, including time to complete, number of missions attempted/completed, strategy, and code.

“The Nevada Finals mark the end of a spectacular coding/robotics season,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek. “It was especially gratifying to see so many schools without their own computer science course participating in the CRCCs. We wanted to introduce coding literacy to all students, including those in schools where geographical or funding issues may be barring course implementation. According to teacher feedback that is exactly what we did. We will continue to make the CRCCs free-to-participate events, and we can hardly wait to see how many sign-up for the next competition season.”

In the spring, CRCC will be run in West Virginia and the 2019/20 season will kick off soon after that.

For more information about CRCC, visit https://CRCC.io

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#CRCCforAll NH DOE

Winners of Second Annual New Hampshire Cyber Robotics Coding Competition Announced

 

DERRY, N.H. – Dec. 20, 2018 – The New Hampshire Department of Education and the Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation (ISCEF), along with sponsors Intelitek, the University of New Hampshire (UNH), New Hampshire 4-H, Yaskawa Motoman, and Oracle Academy, are announcing the winners of the state’s second annual Cyber Robotics Coding Competition (CRCC) finals. The finals took place on Dec. 15 at the UNH campus in Durham.

Thomas Aquinas School located in Derry emerged as the CRCC champion, winning the gold medal for overall first place. Monadnock Regional High School in Swanzey won a gold medal for placing first in the high school category.

The finals were the culminating event for eight weeks of virtual competition in which more than 4,200 students from 61 middle and high schools used CoderZ, a cloud-based coding platform, to complete 103 difficult missions in the weeks leading up to the finals. The students of New Hampshire completed more than 30,000 missions and 55 students completed all 103 missions. In addition to prizes for inclusiveness and female participation, the top schools competed all day at the UNH campus for first, second and third place.

“The increase in student involvement for the second year of this program is impressive and exciting,” said Frank Edelblut, the commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Education. “Seeing all of the students at the finals at UNH – as well as the teachers who helped them compete – was inspiring. With continued focus and work, I’m sure we’ll reach our goal of having a million students, around the world, learning valuable coding skills while also having fun.”

The following awards were also presented:

  • Inclusiveness Award (for highest student participation) – North Hampton School (95 percent participation)
  • Grace Hopper Award (for highest female participation) – Litchfield Middle School (55 female competitors)
  • Second Place (Silver Medal) – Litchfield Middle School
  • Third Place (Bronze Medal) – Elm Street Middle School in Nashua

New Hampshire was the first state to hold the competition. That event, held at the end of 2017, gave rise to an international phenomenon that has resulted in more than 150,000 students all over the world participating in similar events. To date, more than 37,500 students in 590 schools across 26 states in United States have been able to participate in CRCC events.

Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek, said one of the company’s main goals in developing the CoderZ platform was introducing robotics and coding in a way that would be easily accessible to all students.

“We launched CRCC in 2017 in New Hampshire and it is so appropriate to end the 2018 season in New Hampshire after a successful roll-out country wide,” he said. “There are lots of STEAM-based activities happening in informal educational environments, like after-school robotics clubs. These activities have been able to capture the interest of many students, but how do we create something that is scalable to nearly every single child? We believe it’s through events like CRCC!”

Parties interested in organizing Cyber Robotics Competitions for their school, district or state can contact ISCEF at info@iscefoundation.org.

 

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About Intelitek

Intelitek has been transforming education and bringing robotics into classrooms across the globe through comprehensive technology learning solutions for more than 30 years. The Company’s innovative tools and technologies empower instructors and inspire students to improve the world around them. Intelitek’s sustainable support and professional development ensure the continued success of educational programs. By helping deliver the competencies needed for in-demand careers, Intelitek is producing results for students, teachers, nations, and economies. For more information visit www.intelitek.com.


Intelitek’s CoderZ Recognized as a Finalist in the 2019 Bett Awards

Intelitek CoderZ equips students with fundamental STEM skills through an interactive online platform

DERRY, N.H. – Nov. 12, 2018 – Intelitek today announced that its online coding program, CoderZ, was chosen as a finalist in the 2019 Bett Awards program.

This year marks the 34th year of the Bett Show, a celebration of the inspiring creativity and innovation that can be found throughout technology for education. As the first industry show of the year in the education technology landscape, this year it expects to bring together 850 leading companies, 103 exciting new edtech start-ups and nearly 35,000 attendees from 131 countries within the global education community.

Finalists were selected by a panel of education professionals and experts in their particular information and communications technology (ICT) area who reviewed the submissions that were entered and judged the products and services based on the extent to which they have excelled in ICT provision and support for nurseries, schools, colleges and special schools alike with a clear focus on what works in the classroom. The British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA) acted as Chair of judges, overseeing the impartiality and fairness of the judging.

CoderZ was named a finalist for Best International Digital Education Resource. The powerful, easy to use online platform teaches students in grades 6-12 valuable STEM skills such as coding, robotics and physical computing that will help their careers and prepare them for college. CoderZ has a fun interface that utilizes an online code editor catered to both beginners and experts, offering a simple, Scratch-like language called Blockly for new coders or allowing more advanced students to start working directly with Java code. The program is currently being used around the globe in a series of Cyber Robotics Coding Competitions (CRCC) with the intention of putting the world of coding and robotics in the hands of all students.

“Being named a finalist in this year’s Bett Awards is an immense honor for Intelitek,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek. “CoderZ successfully provides students with the detailed guidance and instruction they need to learn and understand programming, and we’re proud to be recognized on this international stage.”

The winners of the 2019 Bett Awards will be announced at the award ceremony at the Troxy in London on Jan. 23, 2019.

 

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The Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation Partners with Girls Who Code

New mid-Atlantic region collaboration designed to spur girls’ participation in coding competitions and coding clubs

GWC-logo_2016-on-navyDERRY, N.H. – Sept. 17, 2018The Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation (ISCEF) is partnering with Girls Who Code, a national nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in technology and change the image of what a programmer looks like and does. Girls Who Code runs free after-school programs to promote gender equity in the computer science, technology and STEM fields. To further spur girls’ interest and participation in coding, the two organizations will promote one another’s activities in the mid-Atlantic states and have plans to expand their collaboration to other regions.

Through the Girls Who Code Clubs program, girls learn to use computer science to impact their community and join a supportive sisterhood of peers and role models across the United States. Clubs center around a Girls Who Code Project, where Club girls work as a team to design and build a project that solves real-world problems they care about through code (programming). Importantly, Girls Who Code Clubs teach girls much more than computer science: they help unlock potential for creativity, bravery, resilience and purpose as girls learn how to use computer science to impact their community.

The Girls Who Code- ISCEF partnership currently covers those Clubs in New York state, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Virginia and West Virginia. In those states, Girls Who Code will offer members of existing, new and forming Clubs the opportunity to participate in ISCEF’s Cyber Robotics Coding Competitions (CRCC), which are web-based coding competitions that provide students and educators with the opportunity to build coding-robotics skills using a cloud-based simulation platform featuring a virtual, 3D-animated robot.

“We’re so grateful to be working with the Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation in the mid-Atlantic region. We’re bringing our lessons of bravery, sisterhood and coding to the area to show girls that they can change the world with computer science,” said Tarika Barrett, Ph. D., the COO of Girls Who Code.

The first CRCC was held in New Hampshire at the end of 2017 and gave rise to an international phenomenon that has resulted in more than 30,000 students all over the world participating in similar events. Of the competitions based in the United States, more than 32 percent of participants have been female. Beginning in October, up to 11 states across the country and counting will host Cyber Robotics Coding Competitions. For more information go to https://iscefoundation.org/cyber-robotics-coding-competition or to express interest in organizing a Cyber Robotics Competitions for a school, district or state, contact ISCEF at info@iscefoundation.org.

About CRCC

The Cyber Robotics Coding Competition (CRCC) is the first-of-its-kind online competition designed to be interactive and exciting as participants learn how robots work and expand their knowledge of STEM careers. Competitors undertake their missions on Intelitek’s CoderZ Cyber Robotics Learning Environment, a cloud-based platform featuring a graphical simulation of LEGO robotics kits. The innovative, online platform has a coding interface where users between 6th and 12th grade can activate a virtual robot, or “cyber-robot,” and watch the results in a real-time simulation. For more information about CRCC please visit https://crcc.io.

About Intelitek

Intelitek has been transforming education and bringing robotics into classrooms across the globe through comprehensive technology learning solutions for more than 30 years. The Company’s innovative tools and technologies empower instructors and inspire students to improve the world around them. Intelitek’s sustainable support and professional development ensure the continued success of educational programs. By helping deliver the competencies needed for in-demand careers, Intelitek is producing results for students, teachers, nations, and economies.

About Girls Who Code

Girls Who Code is a national non-profit organization working to close the gender gap in technology and change the image of what a programmer looks like and does. With their 7-week Summer Immersion Program, a 2-week specialized Campus Program, after school Clubs, and a 13-book New York Times best-selling series, they are leading the movement to inspire, educate, and equip young women with the computing skills to pursue 21st century opportunities. Girls Who Code has reached over 90,000 girls in all 50 states and several US territories. To join the movement or learn more, visit https://girlswhocode.com.


Six Ways to Get Your School on the Education 4.0 Train

EdFutures

This Guest Blog was originally published on Education Weeks Education Futures Channel on June 7, 2018 – See article here

By Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek.

Seeing gaps between what you’re teaching and what your students need to be able to compete effectively in the modern workforce? Here’s how to close them.

We have experienced four industrial revolutions in the last 250 years. These revolutions have completely changed the industrial world, but also many aspects of the community, the practical nature of the workforce, and the way we live in modern times.

In the educational world, the change has not happened as quickly and at Intelitek we have implemented an approach – Education 4.0 – that aligns modern learning with modern industry. Education 4.0 is having a similar, profound impact on how instructors teach and how students learn. Put simply, it defines “what it takes” to cultivate active members of society and employees who can play a valuable role in the new industrial workspace.

The rapid change in industry has caused the misalignment between what industry needs in this respect and the skills students graduate with. The educational path taken in many schools and classrooms today–isn’t always perfect. In fact, there are some clear gaps, as evidenced by the lack of qualified, skilled workers in the current (and emerging) labor pool.

Here are six ways to close those gaps and get your school on the Education 4.0 train today:

  1. Create a tailor-made learning path. Design a personal learning path that suits each student’s strengths and interests. This will allow them to build knowledge based on their individual previous knowledge or experience, and on their acceptance of the new information. Solutions should never force all students to learn the same thing at the same time and at the same pace.
  2. Leverage formative assessments. This will enable educational staff to help students identify their own strengths and also pinpoint their own weaknesses. A formative assessment is focused on helping the student accept and learn the new information and does not classify students based on test results.
  3. Transform teachers into mentors. Teachers must be trained on the fine points of building new curriculum and offering every one of their students a personal journey. They should be expected not to lead, but rather to support learning. For example, teachers must be able to use their own vast knowledge to assist students in a mentoring capacity during their own personal journeys.
  4. Embrace divergence and pluralism. Students are not the same and they are also not expected to be the same. The role of the education system is to help students identify the field in which they are suited and help them to excel at it. When teachers find their areas of aptitude, it gives the students a better chance to serve their society as adults.
  5. Stop equating education with knowledge acquisition. Education–not knowledge transfer–should be every school’s goal. Today’s schools will determine the development of society in the future. And while no one can predict the future, the universal values of doing good, accepting others, and collaborating with them will always be essential. This will hold true even when the graduates of today’s education system take on the societal roles of tomorrow.
  6. Put teachers at the heart of Education 4.0. Contrary to other beliefs, no one really wants to replace teachers with robots. In fact, teachers and mentors should be one and the same, and should shepherd students to success in the work world and in life. Design programs for teacher training, give them pedagogic tools, and provide them with a support structure that improves the relationship between the teacher and the student, enabling the former to interact more effectively. And remember that technology is there to serve teachers, allowing them to be even more effective instructors in the long run.

Intelitek Releases White Paper on Changing Education Systems to Prepare Students for the Demands of Modern Society and the Industrial Workspace

“The Education 4.0 Revolution” white paper explains why education systems need to keep pace with major industrial changes and shares principles for transforming learning

DERRY, N.H. – June 6, 2018 – Historic changes in industry should and must have a direct impact on the way a society builds its education system. That is the main assertion of a new white paper released by Intelitek. Titled “The Education 4.0 Revolution: An analysis of Industry 4.0 and its effect on education,” the paper explains how and why education paradigms must shift in order to align with future careers and jobs. The paper outlines the Education 4.0 approach of Intelitek, which transforms students from passive recipients of information to active participants in a personal learning process.

According to the white paper, the last 250 years have brought forth four industrial revolutions, each sparked by an innovation: (1) the steam engine; (2) the production line; (3) the computer and (4) the internet. “These revolutions have completely changed not just industries but also societal structures, the nature of work, and the way we see living in modern times,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek. “They should have just as significant an impact on education, and yet the pace of change has been much slower in that field.”

As pointed out in “The Education 4.0 Revolution,” pedagogical change has, to an extent, lagged behind the last two revolutions. The paper states, “Internet technology has allowed students to participate in long distance learning and have access to unlimited sources of information. However, since the teaching and learning approach has not changed, and learning outcomes are still being tested according to the criteria defined in the second industrial revolution, the education system does not adequately benefit from computers and the internet and it remains stuck somewhere in the same paradigm of the requirements of the second industrial revolution.”

The paper goes on to describe the four fundamental principles of Intelitek’s particular Education 4.0 instructional approach:

  • The learning path is tailor made
  • Assessment should be formative
  • Teachers need to be mentors
  • Divergence and pluralism must be prevalent

“With our Education 4.0 approach, students are always guided by the teacher but construct their knowledge actively rather than just mechanically, ingesting knowledge from the teacher as well as other printed and online resources,” said Yerushalmi. “Our approach is inspired by Industry 4.0 and so we have designed it to give teachers the pedagogic tools and support to bring teaching and learning up to par with the demands of the Industry 4.0 society.”

A complimentary copy of “The Education 4.0 Revolution: An analysis of Industry 4.0 and its effect on education” can be downloaded at this link

About Intelitek
Intelitek has been transforming education and bringing robotics into classrooms across the globe through comprehensive technology learning solutions for more than 35 years. The Company’s innovative tools and technologies empower instructors and inspire students to improve the world around them. Intelitek’s sustainable support and professional development ensure the continued success of educational programs. By helping deliver the competencies needed for in-demand careers, Intelitek is producing results for students, teachers, nations, and economies.

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Up to 60 WV Middle Schoolers to Advance to Final Round in Cyber Robotics Coding Competition

Virtual robotics coding event sponsored by NASA IV&V ERC, Oracle Academy, A3L Federal Works, Fairmont State University, CoderZ, and the Intelitek STEM & CTE Education Foundation

DERRY, N.H. – May 15, 2018 – Students from middle schools across West Virginia are gearing up for the final round of their Cyber Robotics Coding Competition (CRCC), a program that provides students and educators with the opportunity to build coding-robotics skills for real or virtual 3D robots. On May 17, those finalists will gather at the Fairmont State University (FSU) campus for a coding faceoff and an awards ceremony. NASA’s Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Educator Resource Center, FSU, A3L Federal Works and the Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation (ISCEF) partnered to launch this spring version of CRCC in West Virginia.

To date, more than 30,000 students all over the world have participated in CRCC events. The West Virginia event attracted 2,271 students as participants. After completing both the boot camp and the week of code phases – the 15 top schools were selected to compete in the finals.

“The competition takes robotics and leverages it into the coding world – such an important aspect of STEM,” said Todd I. Ensign, Ed.D., the program manager for the NASA IV&V Educator Resource Center and a geoscience lecturer at FSU. Ensign was responsible for the outreach that resulted in the current spring event. “The schools and students who can best strategize, plan and complete the multi-level challenges will be the coding champions.”

Up to four students from each school will compete in the Finals, coding through fifteen missions during the first 90-minute phase and a three-part mission in the subsequent 60-minute second phase. Awards will be presented for performance and student participation ratios.

“Our aim, through these CRCC events is to get educators and students excited about STEM through coding robotics and computer science and lower the apprehension many have regarding coding, robotics and technology in general,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek. “These events not only recognize schools and teachers investing in STEM but help build collaboration between state education boards and companies specializing in, and supporting, STEM.”

Additional CRCC competitions are in the works for the fall in New Hampshire, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New Jersey, Nevada and Maryland. For more information on the competitions go to https://iscefoundation.org/cyber-robotics-coding-competition or contact Joshua Schuler, Director of CRCC at ISCEF at jschuler@iscefoundation.org.

About CRCC

The first-of-its-kind Cyber Robotics Coding Competition CRCC created by ISCEF and is supported by Intelitek and Oracle Academy, Oracle’s free educational program that advances computer science education globally. The online competition is designed to be interactive and exciting as participants learn how robots work and expand their knowledge of STEM careers. Competitors undertake their missions on Intelitek’s CoderZ Cyber Robotics Learning Environment, a cloud-based platform featuring a graphical simulation of LEGO robotics kits. The innovative, online platform has a coding interface where users between 6th and 12th grade can activate a virtual robot, or “cyber-robot,” and watch the results in a real-time simulation.

Students and teachers need no prior coding or robotics knowledge. The events include professional development and training for teachers and boot camp activities in which students learn and practice intensively from any Chrome computer browser. The missions are self-directed, and individual students can progress at their own pace. In the West Virginia event, students went from boot camp activities to a Week of Code event that was held in the first part of May and featured 21 challenges.

Competitions range in size from 20 to hundreds of schools and can be held over several weeks or at a one-day event. The finals can be a weeklong online competition and/or a face-to-face codeathon. An entire school can participate in a competition, and no special hardware is required. Participation is supported by sponsorships.

Parties interested in organizing Cyber Robotics Competitions for their school, district or state can contact ISCEF at info@iscefoundation.org.

About Intelitek

Intelitek has been transforming education and bringing robotics into classrooms across the globe through comprehensive technology learning solutions for more than 30 years. The Company’s innovative tools and technologies empower instructors and inspire students to improve the world around them. Intelitek’s sustainable support and professional development ensure the continued success of educational programs. By helping deliver the competencies needed for in-demand careers, Intelitek is producing results for students, teachers, nations, and economies.

About Oracle Academy

As Oracle’s flagship philanthropic educational program, Oracle Academy advances computer science education globally to drive knowledge, innovation, skills development, and diversity in technology fields, offering a free and complete portfolio of software, curriculum, hosted technology, faculty trainings, support, and certification resources. Supporting more than 3.5 million students annually in 120 countries, the program works with public and private partners to provide the tools educators need to engage, inspire and prepare students to become innovators and leaders of the future. Through Oracle Academy, students receive hands-on experience with the latest technologies, helping to make them college and career ready in the era of big data, cloud computing, the Internet of Things, and beyond, please visit us at academy.oracle.com.

Trademarks
Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates.   #  #  #


Intelitek Sponsors NH Cyber Robotics Coding Competition

New Hampshire Department of Education and Intelitek STEM and CTE Education Foundation (ISCEF) Join Forces to announce the NH Cyber Robotics Coding Challenge.

Oct 17, Derry, NH – Intelitek are excited to announce co-sponsorship in the launch of the New Hampshire – Cyber Robotics Coding Competition (NH-CRCC). Open to all middle schools and high schools in New Hampshire, this virtual robotics competition gives  students the opportunity to experience coding and robotics first hand.
The NH-CRCC recognizes inclusiveness and diversity in STEM education, capitalizing on this opportunity and get as many students involved as possible.

“This event perfectly complements other work being done in NH to promote and support K-12 STEM education, including our Robotics Education initiative and our work to broaden participation in Engineering and Computer Science,” said Frank Edelblut, Commissioner. “We are excited to work with a NH-based company that is doing so much for K-12 education.”

“Robotics and coding is a pathway to industry in the 21st century,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of Intelitek in Derry, NH. “The CRCC Competition, combined with the gaming like interface of CoderZ makes coding and robotics fun. We expect to see the New Hampshire students loving this new approach to learning math, science, technology and engineering and are proud to work with our local schools on this event.”

Schools can sign up all grades and the competition will kick off on October 30th with a Webinar / PD session.CRCC-NHPic-03

The main competitive event will be an online competition taking place during Computer Science Week (December 4-10). This will all culminate on December 19th with face-to-face finals to compete for the Governor’s Award and award ceremony for all category winners.
For school registration and additional information please visit: https://iscefoundation.org/nh-crcc


Bridging the gap between schools and enterprises

Cooperation between Huangpu District Development Zone accelerator, Intelitek and Guangdong Zhongzhu Robot Co., Ltd

September 27 –  The Intelitek “smart plant training system” was officially launched in Guangzhou Development Zone accelerator. The system is jointly developed by Guangdong Institute of Robotics and Guangdong Zhongzhu Robot Co., Ltd., and is also one of the key projects in Guangzhou in cooperation with intelligent equipment.

Link to original article in Chinese – https://www.hkcd.com/content/2017-09/27/content_1066427.html

It aims to solve the demand of talent in the IAB program problem. It is reported that the introduction of the “wisdom factory training system” has a complete industrial equipment, through the simulation of a set of automated production processes, flexible to carry out “training equipment, teaching courses and 3D simulation” trinity of mixed teaching mode, To help teachers to complete the true sense of the integration of teaching training objectives.

Using the Internet teaching platform, the use of e-learning programs to achieve custom learning management system structures and curriculum content delivery, so that students through the work of the situation set, continuous exercise learning. After working on the job, may be skilled in the operation of the robot, the rapid growth of intelligent manufacturing field of “knowledge + practice + innovation” advanced technology talent, has been in the United States, Switzerland, Germany, Britain, Russia, France, South Korea, Japan More than 40 countries of the university, vocational college, secondary school to be applied.

According to Xu Qiang, head of China Guangdong Robot Co., Ltd., the training system has developed a training course which is in line with the domestic automated production process, and with the South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Panyu Vocational and Technical College, Guangzhou Railway Vocational and Technical College, Guangzhou Engineering Vocational and Technical College and the Guangzhou Institute of Mechanical and Electrical Technician and other institutions to discuss the curriculum cooperation matters.

Next, the two sides will also jointly introduce Intelitek in the automotive manufacturing, industrial maintenance, STEM education and other areas for training system.

2017-09-27
Source: Hong Kong Business Network
[Hong Kong Commercial Daily Reuters report]


EdTechTimes Posts Intelitek Article

Can Today’s Students Succeed at the Jobs of Tomorrow?

Will the rise of robotics and artificial intelligence in the workplace eventually rob today’s students of tomorrow’s careers? The question has become a growing concern among experts and researchers in the education and technology arena. In fact, earlier this month, a survey from the Pew Research Center of 1,408 experts in the field found that a full one-third of them believed that education systems would not evolve enough within the next 10 years to prepare workers for future jobs.   Read the Article


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